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Vietnamese cuisine

This is a discussion on Vietnamese cuisine within the Member Discussion forums, part of the Community Center category; Typical Vietnamese family meals A typical meal for the average Vietnamese family would include: * Individual bowls of rice * ...

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    Default Vietnamese cuisine

    Typical Vietnamese family meals

    A typical meal for the average Vietnamese family would include:

    * Individual bowls of rice
    * Meat, fish or seafood (grilled, boiled, steamed, stewed or stir fried with vegetables)
    * Stir-fried, raw, pickled or steamed vegetables
    * Canh (a clear broth with vegetables and often meat or seafood) or other Vietnamese-style soup
    * Prepared fish sauce and/or soy sauce for dipping, to which garlic, chili, ginger or lime juice are sometimes added according to taste.

    All dishes apart from the individual bowls of rice are communal and to be shared.

    Popularity

    Outside of Vietnam, Vietnamese cuisine is widely available in countries with strong Vietnamese immigrant communities, such as Australia, the United States, Canada, and France. Vietnamese cuisine is also popular in Japan, Korea, Czech Republic, Germany, Poland, and Russia, and in areas with dense Asian populations.

    In recent years, Vietnamese cuisine has become popular in other Southeast Asian countries such as Laos, and Thailand.

    Dishes that have become trademarks of Vietnamese cuisine are phở, gỏi cuốn (spring/summer rolls), bún, and bánh mì (Vietnamese baguette).

    Television shows featuring Vietnamese food have increased its publicity. On The Great Food Truck Race, a vietnamese sandwich truck called Nom Nom Truck received the most money in the first five episodes.

    Anthony Bourdain wrote for the Financial Times in 2005, “A year from now, I plan to live here. I will move to a small fishing village in a coastal area of Vietnam near Hoi An. I have no idea what I'm going to do there, other than write about the experience. I plan only on being a visual curiosity, the lone westerner in a Vietnamese community; to rent a house, move in with few, if any, expectations and let the experience wash over me. Whatever happens, happens.”


    Philosophical influences on Vietnamese cuisine

    Yin Yang balance

    The principle of yin and yang is applied in selecting the ingredients of a dish and the dishes of a meal, in matching dishes with seasonal or climatic conditions, with the prevalent environment and with the current physical well-being of the diners.

    Some examples are:

    * Duck meat is considered as "cool" so is served in summer, which is hot, and with ginger fish sauce which is "warm", while chicken which is "warm" and pork which is "hot" are used in cold winters.
    * Seafood ranging from "cool" to "cold" are suitable to use with ginger ("warm").
    * Spicy, which is extremely yang, must be harmonized by sour, which is extremely yin.
    * Balut ("cold") must be combined with Vietnamese mint ("hot").
    * Cold and flu patients must drink ginger water ("hot").

    Five element correspondence

    Vietnamese cuisine is influenced by the Asian principle of five elements and Mahābhūta.
    Many Vietnamese dishes include five spices (Vietnamese: ngũ vị): spicy (metal), sour (wood), bitter (fire), salty (water) and sweet (Earth), corresponding to: five organs (Vietnamese: ngũ tạng): gall bladder, small intestine, large intestine, stomach and urinary bladder.[citation needed]
    Vietnamese dishes also include five types of nutrients (Vietnamese: ngũ chất): powder, water or liquid, mineral elements, protein and fat.
    Vietnamese cooks try to have five colours (Vietnamese: ngũ sắc): white (metal), green (wood), yellow (Earth), red (fire) and black (water) in their dishes.
    Dishes in Vietnam appeal to gastronomes via five senses (Vietnamese: năm giác quan): food arrangement attracts eyes, sounds come from crisp ingredients, five spices detected on the tongue, aromatic ingredients coming mainly from herbs stimulate the nose and some meals, especially finger food, can be perceived by touching.

    Cultural importance

    Cooking and eating play an extremely important role in Vietnamese culture. The word ăn (eat) is included in a great number of proverbs and has a large range of semantic extensions.[citation needed] Salt is used as the connection between the world of the living and the world of the dead. Bánh phu thê is used to remind new couples of perfection and harmony at their weddings. Food is often placed at the ancestral altar as an offering to the dead.

    Popular Vietnamese dishes

    For a longer list of popular dishes, see List of Vietnamese dishes. For a list of popular dishes organized by province, see List of Vietnamese culinary specialities.

    When Vietnamese dishes are referred to in English, it is generally by the Vietnamese name with the diacritics left off. Some dishes have gained descriptive English names as well.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Vietnamese cuisine

    Yes Dear,

    Thanks for you informed of Typical Vietnamese family meals.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Vietnamese cuisine

    thanks for the post. I plan to visit Vietnam for next year after Macau. At least I do have any ideas regarding your custom.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Vietnamese cuisine

    Not al all. All of you are welcomed. Hope to see u in Vietnam.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Vietnamese cuisine

    thanks for the information about Vietnamese food as it was a complete mystery for me.